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Gangster was started ten years ago as a methods of tracking and reporting the social growth of gangs worldwide.It is based on factual reporting from journalists worldwide.Cultural Research gleaned from Gangster is used to better understand the problems surrounding the unprecedented growth during this period and societies response threw the courts and social inititives to Gangs and Gang culture. Gangster is owner and run by qualified sociologists and takes no sides within the debate of the rights and wrongs of GANG CULTURE but is purely an observer.Gangster has over a million viewers worldwide.Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite.
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Friday, 30 December 2011

Jose Lopez-Buelna, aka "Miguel," 51, was sentenced to 20 years in prison and Erik Dushawn Webster, 47, was sentenced to 25 years

Posted On 17:33 0 comments

Jose Lopez-Buelna, aka "Miguel," 51, was sentenced to 20 years in prison and Erik Dushawn Webster, 47, was sentenced to 25 years by U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro.

They were also sentenced to five years of supervised release.

Lopez-Buelna pleaded guilty on Feb. 16, 2011, to conspiracy to distribute five kilograms or more cocaine, conspiracy to launder money and two counts of money laundering.

Webster was convicted by a federal jury on Feb. 18 of conspiracy to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine and conspiracy to launder money.

At the sentencing hearings, the court found the drug distribution conspiracy in this case involved 150 kilograms or more of cocaine.

According to court documents and testimony, Lopez-Buelna and co-defendant Jesus Gastelum recruited various individuals, including Webster, to drive motor homes outfitted with lead-lined, hidden compartments throughout the United States, Mexico and Canada beginning in 2007.

The hidden compartments were used to conceal drugs and money.

The drivers would make stops in various destinations, including Atlanta, Chicago, New York and Montreal.

Gastelum, who faces drug and money laundering charges, is currently a fugitive.

Another co-defendant, Adolph Vargas, pleaded guilty to charges in January 2011 to conspiracy to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine and one count of money laundering was sentenced in November to 87 months in prison followed by two years of supervised release.

The court recovered two recreational vehicles, two semi-automatic pistols, various other vehicles and more than $4 million during the course of the investigation.

The case was investigated by the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and the Internal Revenue Service - Criminal Division.

The case was prosecuted by Mary Woelfle and Margaret Honrath of the Criminal Division's Organized Crime and Gang Section.


Thursday, 29 December 2011

Two alleged associates of the Hells Angels have been charged after a police officer was put in a headlock and punched several times

Posted On 22:13 0 comments

Two alleged associates of the Hells Angels have been charged after a police officer was put in a headlock and punched several times in front of a Kelowna nightclub Tuesday.

Shortly after 2 a.m. two uniformed Kelowna RCMP members were on patrol when they saw a fight break out between several men on Leon Avenue. When they moved in to arrest the main aggressor, one of the officers was jumped from behind and attacked.

The officer who was punched ended up with swelling and bruising.

Kelowna RCMP spokeswoman Sgt. Ann Morrison was unable to say what caused the fight.

“I can confirm we are having difficulty receiving cooperation from the parties involved,” she said.

Kelowna’s Pedro Amestica, 39, was charged with assaulting a police officer and resisting arrest. He does not have a criminal record and police say he is a known associate of the Mission City chapter of the Hells Angels.

Thomas Volker, a 37-year-old from Mission, is charged with assaulting a police officer. He has a criminal record and police say he is a member of the Mission City Hells Angels.

Both men have appeared before a justice of the peace and have been released from custody. Their next court appearance is scheduled for Jan. 12 in Kelowna



Anuj Bidve, 23, was shot in the side of the head as he walked with friends near their hotel in Salford, Greater Manchester,

Posted On 18:20 0 comments

Anuj Bidve, 23, was shot in the side of the head as he walked with friends near their hotel in Salford, Greater Manchester, in the early hours of the morning.
Five people have now been arrested over the incident.
Chief Superintendent Kevin Mulligan, divisional commander for Salford, said today: "We have not established a clear motive for the senseless murder of Anuj, and there is no definitive evidence pointing to it being racially-motivated.
"However, we are treating this as a hate crime based on the growing perceptions within the community it was motivated by hate."
Speaking at a press conference at Greater Manchester Police headquarters, he added: "What we are saying is we do not know whether it's racially motivated or not. But by definition we need to treat any incident of this kind where there is a perception that race is involved or hate is involved and categorise it as a hate incident."


Suspect in Juárez consulate killings extradited

Posted On 13:42 0 comments

 

An alleged prison gang member wanted in connection with the killing of a U.S. consulate employee, her husband and another employee's spouse has been extradited to the United States, Mexican authorities have announced. Joel Abraham Caudillo was handed over to FBI agents Dec. 20 in Veracruz at the same time that Julian “El Piolin” Zapata Espinoza, wanted in the February killing of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agent Jaime Zapata, was extradited. Mexican authorities announced Caudillo's extradition this week. He's one of 35 people charged in a drug conspiracy case that alleges that the Barrio Azteca prison gang, working with the Juárez Cartel, engaged in drug trafficking and murder on both sides of the Rio Grande. Officials say that gang members in Ciudad Juárez on March 13, 2010, killed U.S. consulate employee Leslie Ann Enriquez Catton; her husband, Arthur Redelf, an El Paso County jailer; and Jorge Alberto Salcido Ceniceros, the husband of a consulate employee. Caudillo is accused of destroying one of the vehicles used in Ceniceros' killing. Extraditions in the case have been done surreptitiously during holidays. Near Labor Day weekend in 2010, Jesus Ernesto “El Camello” Chávez Castillo, a suspect in the killings, was brought to San Antonio for a closed court hearing. Court records in his case remain sealed.


all is quiet on Calgary’s gang front.

Posted On 13:40 0 comments

 

With no killings between FOB and FK in nearly three years and the biggest case of them all — the 2009 triple murder at Bolsa Restaurant — resulting in at least two convictions, it would be tempting to assume all is quiet on Calgary’s gang front. That assumption would be wrong. As detailed in a recent article, no small amount of effort goes into monitoring the gang members who aren’t either dead or in jail to prevent any further violence. However, we live in a society that values quantifiable results: while it’s easy to tally the number of bad guys who have been arrested, the amount of drugs seized or illegal guns taken off the street, it’s much harder to measure how many murders police may have prevented. It has happened, however, and only continued pressure will keep the violence in check. But that’s not the only unfinished business for Calgary police: there are at least 20 homicides connected to the gang war which remain unsolved — investigations police have been able to devote more time to, thanks to the relatively low number of homicides recorded in Calgary during 2011. Prior to the Bolsa massacre, when innocent restaurant patron Keni Su’a was slaughtered trying to flee the eatery, it was common for Calgarians to be indifferent to the death toll as long as gangsters kept killing each other. Bolsa exposed the fundamental flaw in that indifference: allow criminals with little regard for human life to run loose and it’s only a matter of time before an innocent is hurt or killed. The public may not be clamouring for police to solve the murders of 20 people who were either gangsters or people who made the poor choice of hanging out with criminals, but Bolsa demonstrated why all Calgarians have a vested interest in getting their killers off the street. For homicide investigators, an unsolved case is a case that needs solving — no matter if the victim was a criminal himself. “We are looking at cold case homicides, and included in that is, of course, are all the organized crime ones,” Staff Sgt. Grant Miller of the homicide unit said recently. “We’re motivated to solve them.” We live in a country where the rule of law is supreme, and it dictates justice must be available to all — justice that’s meted out in a courtroom, not at the end of the barrel of a gun.


Wednesday, 28 December 2011

WEST Vancouver gangster Omid Bayani can look forward to seven years in a federal jail if he makes a public reappearance.

Posted On 14:14 0 comments





But so far it's unknown whether the UN gang member is on the lam from the law, or has met with a more sinister fate at the hands of gang rivals.

Bayani, 36, disappeared in September, just two days before he was to be sentenced in Ontario for trafficking a massive quantity of the date-rape drug GHB.

The judge in the case described it as "the largest seizure of GHB in Canadian history."

At the time Bayani went missing, police said he appeared to be headed to one of the North Shore gyms he frequented when he left his West Vancouver home that afternoon. He hasn't been seen since.

If he does show up, however, there will be a spot in a federal jail cell waiting for him, after an Ontario superior court justice sentenced him in absentia to spend seven years in jail for his crimes - an eight-year sentence reduced by one year for time already spent in custody.

According to facts set out in court documents, in late 2005, Bayani sold 600 litres of GHB to Mehrdad Bahman, a prospective member of the Toronto chapter of Hell's Angels.

But before any money changed hands, police in Ontario got wind of the deal and the location of a garage where Bahman was storing the GHB through a Hells Angels informant.

Police moved in and seized 350 litres of the drug, making it look like the garage had been burgled.

After Bayani became angry that he hadn't been paid, Bahman and other Hells Angels associates flew to Vancouver and met Bayani at Joe Fortes restaurant to hammer out a deal to repay the debt.

According to the informant, they agreed Bahman would pay Bayani $80,000.

In handing out the sentence, Justice Robert Clark said the amount underscores that "the potential profit of this illicit activity is enormous."

Clark added Bayani, who was born in Iran and is not a Canadian citizen, had shown no remorse for his actions.

A co-accused in the case, Hells Angels member Vincenzo "Jimmy" Sansalone, was sentenced to six years for his role in the case, which included setting up the Vancouver meeting between Bahman and Bayani.

Bayani's lawyer, Joseph Bloomenfeld, told the judge when Bayani didn't show up to his sentencing hearing that his client may have met with foul play.

But the judge said since he had no evidence of that, he would have to assume that Bayani had simply absconded.


Friday, 23 December 2011

Gangsters even turned up to public meetings to intimidate residents and see who was passing on information to the police.

Posted On 20:07 0 comments

THE BIGGEST police drugs operation South Yorkshire has ever seen - set up to tackle gang violence and murder - was hailed a success today after seven more dealers were locked up.


The operation, which began in August 2009 and has now concluded has seen 83 men, women and juveniles put behind bars for a total of around 150 years or given community sentences.

Police launched Operation Mach after a spate of murders, stabbings and shootings involving members of postcode gangs.

The aim was to deter city youngsters from getting caught up in gangs and drug dealing.

Sentencing the last batch of
defendants, Judge Alan Goldsack QC praised the police and said the sentences should act as a clear warning to drug dealers that ‘the long arm of the law will reach those involved’.

Sheffield Crown Court heard plain clothes officers snared dealers selling cocaine and heroin near schools, in children’s parks and outside places of worship across Sheffield.

The youngest to be convicted was just 13.

In the latest cases Richard Pidcock, 40, of HMP Moorlands, was jailed for three years and a day.

Jamaine Anderson, 26, of Low Edges Crescent, Low Edges, Daniel Anderson, 32, of Gloucester Street, Broomhall, Ramone Robinson, 19 of Weldrake Road, Firth Park, Fabien McLaren, 19, of Beldon Close, Arbourthorne, and Joshua James, 19, of Raleigh Road, Heeley, were jailed for a total of six years, four months.

All were found guilty of selling heroin, crack cocaine or cannabis on the city’s streets.

Superintendent Peter Norman said he devised the operation after residents living in communities blighted by drugs raised repeated concerns about their safety.

He said gangsters even turned up to public meetings to intimidate residents and see who was passing on information to the police.

Supt Norman said: “This was a multi-agency operation targeting criminal gangs who consisted of young men suspected of supplying drugs.

“Traditional policing methods had failed to make the desired impact and it was becoming clear a disproportionate number of young people and local residents were being affected by a growing problem.

“It is critically important young people in Sheffield feel safe and are safe within their communities.”

He added: “This sends out a clear message to anyone thinking of getting involved in drug dealing.

“If you think its safe to deal drugs or be involved in gang-related crime in South Yorkshire, it is not.

“If you think communities will tolerate you, you are wrong. If you think people are afraid to tell us who you are, you are wrong.

“Drugs and violence ruin lives. We will never tolerate it and we will arrest you wherever and whenever we can.”


missing West Vancouver gangster Omid Bayani turns up, he will probably be heading straight to an Ontario jail cell.

Posted On 19:49 0 comments



Bayani has been sentenced in absentia by an Ontario Superior Court judge to seven years for his role in trafficking the date rape drug GHB along with members of the Hells Angels.

Bayani, 36, was reported missing to West Vancouver police in September, two days before his sentencing was scheduled to go ahead.

West Vancouver police Det. Tom Wolff von Gudenberg said at the time that Bayani, who is linked to the United Nations gang, was on his way to the gym when he vanished, leaving his family extremely worried.

Bayani’s first sentencing hearing was adjourned because of his disappearance, which his lawyer attributed to possible “foul play.” At a second sentencing hearing, Judge Robert Clark issued a warrant for Bayani’s arrest, noting the lawyer “had no further intelligence concerning the whereabouts of his client.”

Both Bayani and Haney Hells Angel co-accused Vincenzo (Jimmy) Sansalone were convicted of conspiring to traffic GHB in July 2011 in connection with the largest seizure ever of the “date rape” drug in Canadian history.

The investigation dates back to the fall of 2005 when Bayani sold 600 litres of GHB to Mehrdad Bahman, a prospect with the Toronto chapter of the Hells Angels. Bayani was not paid at the time. A police agent later told authorities that Bahman had a large quantity of GHB stored in a garage in Toronto, which police seized in a raid in February 2006.

“To maintain the integrity of their ongoing investigation, the officers made it appear as though the garage had been burgled. As a result of the seizure, Bahman was unable to pay Bayani and a dispute arose in connection with the outstanding debt; that dispute lasted many months,” Clark noted in his reasons for sentencing, a copy of which was obtained by The Vancouver Sun.

In June 2006, at the direction of a vice-president of the Toronto Hells Angels, the agent came to Vancouver with Bahman and Zavisa Drecic, a full-patch member of the Woodbridge, Ont., chapter to mediate the dispute with Bayani.

Sansalone met them at the airport and took them to the Haney clubhouse. The next day, Drecic and the agent met Bayani at a restaurant in downtown Vancouver and hammered out a repayment plan for the GHB debt.

Sansalone was sentenced to six years for his part in the conspiracy.

Bayani, 36, was a major player who deserved a stiffer sentence because “there was an undercurrent of violence in the aftermath of the drug transaction,” Clark said.

He said the nature of the drug itself was an aggravating feature that had to be taken into account.

“This drug is particularly pernicious. Albeit it has uses other than as a ‘date rape’ vehicle, it is meant, for the most part, to be given to innocent, unsuspecting third parties, mainly women, so as to render them unable to effectively resist men who seek to take sexual advantage of them,” Clark said.

“It is one thing for a person to sell a willing buyer an illegal drug when the buyer knows what he is buying and the risks associated with taking it. It is quite another to sell someone a drug that the vendor knows is going to be administered to an unsuspecting third party.”

He noted that Bahman had already sold 250 litres of GHB by the time the police seized the rest.

“As I understand it, put into someone’s drink, only a few drops of this liquid are sufficient to accomplish the evil it is meant to facilitate. Thus, even considering the lesser amount that appears to have made it to the street, as it were, the potential for serious mischief was enormous,” Clark said.

The judge said Bayani’s failure to show up at sentencing in Toronto was also an aggravating factor despite the lawyer’s assertion something untoward may have happened.

“The totality of the information proffered to this court … to explain Bayani’s failure to attend court does not, with the greatest respect, raise the proposition that he has been the victim of foul play beyond the realm of conjecture. Absent proof of that, I am left to conclude, and do conclude, that the accused has simply absconded.”


Friday, 16 December 2011

A fourth member of Syracuse's Bricktown street gang pleaded guilty

Posted On 16:47 0 comments

A fourth member of Syracuse's Bricktown street gang pleaded guilty this morning to racketeering charges in federal court for alleged acts that included murder, drug trafficking and robbery, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Jaycee Floyd, 22, of Syracuse, pleaded guilty to conspiring with other gang members to commit criminal acts starting in 2000. An indictment naming 13 alleged gang members accuses them of two murder, eight other shootings, two knifings, seven instances of illegal gun possession and 12 acts possessing or selling crack cocaine.

One of the homicide victims was 20-month-old Rashaad Walker Jr., who was killed in November when Bricktown member Saquan Evans fired a gun into the back of a minivan in retaliation for a gang-related shooting two days earlier, the indictment said.

Floyd faces up to life in prison and a $250,000 fine with sentenced.


Friday, 9 December 2011

Gang sweep comes from a 7 month, undercover investigation.

Posted On 13:09 0 comments

Early this morning several police agencies, led by the Gilroy Police Department swept through the city and surrounding areas making several arrest of gang memembers. The gang sweep comes from a 7 month, undercover investigation.

Here is a look at the news release sent by Gilroy Police:

The Gilroy Police Department, Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office, Drug Enforcement Administration and California Department of Justice completed a 7-month covert criminal investigation that focused on the criminal activities of suspected Gilroy criminal street gang members and their associates.

The investigation resulted in the identification of at least 25 suspects who violated California's Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act (STEP Act), as defined in California Penal Code section 186.22. These criminal street gang members and their gang associates organized violent and reckless criminal activity, which caused undue harm upon victims and compromised the safety of our community members.

As a result of the investigation, the Santa Clara County Superior Court issued arrest warrants & search warrants related to the investigation. Portions of the investigation took place in the following cities – Gilroy, Morgan Hill, Hollister and San Jose. However, all of the defendants lived in Gilroy, or were active in a Gilroy based criminal street gang.

The suspects will be prosecuted by the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office for various criminal violations to include – violations of the STEP Act, shooting into an inhabited dwelling, assault with a deadly weapon (firearm), assault with a deadly weapon (vehicle), robbery, criminal conspiracy, narcotic violations, witness intimidation and the use of juvenile offenders to commit crimes to benefit a criminal street gang. If convicted, suspects may be eligible for sentence enhancements (increased incarceration sentences) due to violations of the STEP Act, prior felony convictions and the use of juveniles during the commission of a crime(s).

This investigation marks the second time within recent months that Gilroy Police Department and Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office have collaborated with other local, county, state and federal agencies to disrupt and dismantle criminal activity in Santa Clara County. The investigation and arrests of criminal street gang members and their gang associates continues 2

to affirm our commitment to insuring the safety of our community members and our zero tolerance policy against criminal street gangs.

Law enforcement agencies that provided assistance during the investigation include, but are not limited to, the California Department of Justice, California Department of Justice Task Forces (Unified Narcotic Enforcement Team, Santa Clara County Specialized Enforcement Team & Santa Cruz County Anti-Crime Team), California Highway Patrol, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office, Santa Clara County Probation Department, Santa Clara County – Regional Auto-Theft Task Force (RATTF), Morgan Hill Police Department, Mountain View Police Department, Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety, Campbell Police Department, Milpitas Police Department, High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA), United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives and the United States Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD).


Gang sweep comes from a 7 month, undercover investigation.

Posted On 13:09 0 comments

Early this morning several police agencies, led by the Gilroy Police Department swept through the city and surrounding areas making several arrest of gang memembers. The gang sweep comes from a 7 month, undercover investigation.

Here is a look at the news release sent by Gilroy Police:

The Gilroy Police Department, Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office, Drug Enforcement Administration and California Department of Justice completed a 7-month covert criminal investigation that focused on the criminal activities of suspected Gilroy criminal street gang members and their associates.

The investigation resulted in the identification of at least 25 suspects who violated California's Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act (STEP Act), as defined in California Penal Code section 186.22. These criminal street gang members and their gang associates organized violent and reckless criminal activity, which caused undue harm upon victims and compromised the safety of our community members.

As a result of the investigation, the Santa Clara County Superior Court issued arrest warrants & search warrants related to the investigation. Portions of the investigation took place in the following cities – Gilroy, Morgan Hill, Hollister and San Jose. However, all of the defendants lived in Gilroy, or were active in a Gilroy based criminal street gang.

The suspects will be prosecuted by the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office for various criminal violations to include – violations of the STEP Act, shooting into an inhabited dwelling, assault with a deadly weapon (firearm), assault with a deadly weapon (vehicle), robbery, criminal conspiracy, narcotic violations, witness intimidation and the use of juvenile offenders to commit crimes to benefit a criminal street gang. If convicted, suspects may be eligible for sentence enhancements (increased incarceration sentences) due to violations of the STEP Act, prior felony convictions and the use of juveniles during the commission of a crime(s).

This investigation marks the second time within recent months that Gilroy Police Department and Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office have collaborated with other local, county, state and federal agencies to disrupt and dismantle criminal activity in Santa Clara County. The investigation and arrests of criminal street gang members and their gang associates continues 2

to affirm our commitment to insuring the safety of our community members and our zero tolerance policy against criminal street gangs.

Law enforcement agencies that provided assistance during the investigation include, but are not limited to, the California Department of Justice, California Department of Justice Task Forces (Unified Narcotic Enforcement Team, Santa Clara County Specialized Enforcement Team & Santa Cruz County Anti-Crime Team), California Highway Patrol, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office, Santa Clara County Probation Department, Santa Clara County – Regional Auto-Theft Task Force (RATTF), Morgan Hill Police Department, Mountain View Police Department, Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety, Campbell Police Department, Milpitas Police Department, High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA), United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives and the United States Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD).


14th and Girard gang, also known as G-Rod, 1-4 and the Cut Crew, were responsible for a series of attacks including three slayings

Posted On 13:07 0 comments

grand jury has indicted seven members of a criminal street gang located at 14th and Girard Streets NW who authorities said were responsible for several murders and shootings since 2006, including the 2010 murder of a rival gang member following an afternoon funeral in the busy U Street corridor, the U.S. Attorney’s office announced Thursday.

According to the 80-count indictment, members of the 14th and Girard gang, also known as G-Rod, 1-4 and the Cut Crew, were responsible for a series of attacks including three slayings; the Jan. 9, 2009 fatal shooting of Paul Jones, 17, in the 1300 block of Columbia Road NW; the Aug. 11, 2010 fatal shooting of Sean Robinson, 19, in the 2500 block of 17th and Euclid Streets NW and the Sept. 28, 2010 fatal shooting of Jamal Coates, 21, in the 1300 block of U Street NW. Coates had attended the funeral of Columbia Heights resident Ashley McRae, 21.

Last summer, Damon Sams, 21, ofthe District pled guilty to involuntary manslaughter for accidentally shooting McRae in the forehead while trying to put the safety on the gun he was holding. He and was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Authorities said the three male victims, Jones, Robinson and Coates, were allegedly members of rival gangs.Officials say the gangs had a long history of terrorizing the neighborhoods.

Indicted on various counts including first-degree murder were Lafonte Carlton, 21; Robert Givens, 19; Devyn Black; 22; Ricardo Epps, 22; Marcellus Jackson, 23; Keir Johnson, 21 and Lester Williams, 24. All seven men are from the District.

Carlton and Givens are currently in D.C. jail. Epps and Williams were arrested Monday. Black is in custody for a 2009 shooting. Police are still searching for Jackson and Johnson.

“As alleged, these defendants were part of a dangerous and deadly criminal organization that used threats, intimidation, and extreme violence to protect their turf,” D.C. police Chief Cathy L. Lanier said in a statement. “These indictments are an important step forward in dismantling this ruthless gang and disrupting their reign of terror.”

“This 80-count felony indictment demonstrates our commitment to aggressively targeting the gangs that are so often responsible for inflicting waves of retaliatory violence on our community,” said U. S. Attorney Ronald C. Machen Jr.

A hearing is scheduled Friday for Coleman, Givens, Epps and Williams before D.C. Superior Court Judge Thomas J. Motley.

District Council member Jim Graham (D-Ward 1), who represents the neighborhood where the gangs operated, called the indictment "profoundly important"and said it would help "break up the gang once and for all."


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