Gangster Social Enterise Reporting

Gangster was started ten years ago as a methods of tracking and reporting the social growth of gangs worldwide.It is based on factual reporting from journalists worldwide.Cultural Research gleaned from Gangster is used to better understand the problems surrounding the unprecedented growth during this period and societies response threw the courts and social inititives to Gangs and Gang culture. Gangster is owner and run by qualified sociologists and takes no sides within the debate of the rights and wrongs of GANG CULTURE but is purely an observer.Gangster has over a million viewers worldwide.Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite.
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Friday, 26 March 2010

Patrick Ralph Ponce, 44, of Imperial County, pleaded guilty to drug, weapon, kidnapping and extortion charges, making him the last of 31 gang members

Posted On 08:23 0 comments

Patrick Ralph Ponce, 44, of Imperial County, pleaded guilty to drug, weapon, kidnapping and extortion charges, making him the last of 31 gang members to plead guilty to charges brought by Brown's office. The final conviction concludes "Operation Gangland," which began in 2005 and ultimately shut down a major Mexican Mafia cell spread across Imperial and San Diego Counties. "This Mexican Mafia cell was one of the most violent extortion and drug trafficking rings California's border region has ever seen," Brown said. "With the convictions of all 31 gang members, we've dealt a fatal blow to their criminal enterprise and they will spend a long, long time in prison." Originally indicted in August 2007, the gang members have collectively been sentenced to more than 200 years in prison.
In 2005, officials from the California Attorney General's Office, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the Imperial County District Attorney's Office formed the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force to investigate the Mexican Mafia's criminal activities. The investigation uncovered a widespread drug smuggling and extortion operation directed by Mexican Mafia cell leader Patrick Ponce. The cell used "tax collectors" in El Centro, Calexico, Brawley, Heber, Holtville, Calipatria, and Niland to extort funds from anyone engaged in illegal activity, such as drug sales or immigrant smuggling. Those who refused or failed to pay were attacked by Ponce's enforcers. The "taxes" would be split between the gang member who collected them, Ponce and other gang leaders.
Additionally, Ponce ran a heroin and methamphetamine trafficking operation, distributing and selling narcotics throughout the region. Ponce ordered gang members with outstanding warrants to surrender themselves to officers so that illegal contraband hidden on these individuals could be smuggled into the Imperial County Jail. Gang members attacked anyone who failed to carry out orders. Over the course of the investigation, agents captured Ponce on wiretaps ordering assaults, setting extortion rates and arranging drug sales. Following the investigation, Brown's office assisted Imperial County District Attorney Gilbert G. Otero in preparing the case against the gang. In August 2007, the case was presented to the San Diego County criminal grand jury, which returned a 46-count indictment against 31 members of the cell. Over the past two and a half years, Brown's office has successfully prosecuted all 31 gang members, including:

- Patrick Ralph Ponce ("Pato"), 44, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to kidnapping; two counts of extortion; selling methamphetamine; and supplying a firearm to a felon and is expected to be sentenced to 22 years in state prison;
- Marc Anthony Villasenor ("Joker"), 31, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to assault likely to cause great bodily injury; selling heroin; and assault with a deadly weapon and was sentenced to 20 years, 8 months in state prison;
- Raul Antonio Cruz, Jr. ("Jr."), 33, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to assault with a firearm; three counts of extortion; and three counts of supplying a firearm to a felon and was sentenced to 16 years in state prison;
- Ezequiel Ernesto Rodriguez ("Neto"), 39, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to extortion and admitted carrying a firearm during a gang crime and was sentenced to 15 years in state prison;
- Victorianao Ortiz ("Cyco"), 30, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to assault with a deadly weapon and was sentenced to 14 years in state prison;
- Raul Vega Mejia ("Pollo"), 37, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to two counts of attempted extortion; two counts of extortion; carrying a concealed firearm in a vehicle; and being a felon in possession of a firearm and was sentenced to 13 years in state prison;
- Gabriel Anthony Valles ("Guero"), 47, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to assault with a deadly weapon and admitted carrying a firearm during a gang crime and was sentenced to 9 years in state prison;
- Marco Araujo, 54, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and three counts of selling heroin and was sentenced to 9 years in state prison;
- Juan Antonio Hornback ("Duke"), 31, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to selling heroin and was sentenced to 9 years in state prison;
- Jose Manuel Zepeda, 31, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit extortion and extortion and was sentenced to 9 years in state prison;
- Victor Ruby ("Outlaw"), 38, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to assault likely to cause great bodily injury and was sentenced to 8 years in state prison;
- David Paez Martinez ("Deebo"), 32, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to extortion; two counts of attempted extortion; assault with a firearm; and felon in possession of a firearm and was sentenced to 7 years in state prison;
- Luis Hector Munoz ("Clepto"), 30, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit extortion and extortion and was sentenced to 7 years in state prison;
- Gerardo Robles ("Gerry"), 29, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and selling heroin and was sentenced to 7 years in state prison;
- Jose Espinoza ("Chuck"), 26, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to extortion; receiving stolen property and possession of an assault weapon and was sentenced to 6 years, 4 months in state prison;
- Jaime Alejandro Perez ("Beef"), 26, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to attempted extortion and is expected to be sentenced to 6 years in state prison;
- Jorge Cuevas Mendoza ("Twinx"), 25, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and was sentenced to 5 years in state prison;
- Antonio Padilla ("Kasper"), 34, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and was sentenced to 4 years in state prison;
- Refugio Castellanos Servin, 43, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to selling heroin and was sentenced to 4 years in state prison;
- Manuel Estrada Solarez ("Chile"), 54, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to selling heroin and was sentenced to 4 years in state prison;
- Juan Cordero ("Pollo"), 31, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and was sentenced to 3 years in state prison;
- Max Ponce, Jr. ("Mad Max"), 53, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and was sentenced to 3 years in state prison;
- Anthony Edward Favela ("Shadow"), 37, of San Diego County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and was sentenced to 3 years in state prison;
- Judy Ann Huerta, 29, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin and was sentenced to 3 years in state prison;
- Brian Mark Smith ("Dusty"), 34, of San Diego County, who pleaded guilty to supplying a firearm to a felon and was sentenced to 2 years in state prison;
- Joe Alberto Tamayo ("Drak"), 36, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to extortion and was sentenced to 2 years in state prison;
- Rudy Raymond Ferrel, Jr., 36, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to perjury and was sentenced to 2 years in state prison;
- Armando Salvador Leon ("Fooskie"), 49, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit extortion and was sentenced to formal probation, 435 days jail;
- Eden Macias Portugal, 34, of Imperial County, who pleaded guilty to possession of heroin and was sentenced to summary probation, 355 days jail;
- Maricela Smith, 48, of San Diego County, who pleaded guilty to possession of methamphetamine and was sentenced to formal probation, 234 days jail; and
- Ruby Flores Mendez, 35, of San Diego County, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell methamphetamine and is expected to be sentenced to formal probation.


Thursday, 25 March 2010

Curtis Warren was "fitted up" for a £1m cannabis importation conspiracy.???

Posted On 17:16 0 comments

Solicitor General Howard Sharp told Jersey's Court of Appeal he strongly disputed suggestions from the 43-year-old's barrister that authorities on the Channel Island had attempted to "nail him" for the failed 180kgs drugs plot.On Tuesday Advocate Stephen Baker had argued that Jersey Police had a hostile mind towards the Toxteth-born Warren and were determind to get him at all costs.Yesterday Mr Sharp rejected criticisms from Mr Baker about how certain evidence had been obtained.
Principally that related to Jersey police officers lying to install an illegal bugging device in a car. driven by St Helier-based John Welsh, a longstanding Liverpool friend of Warren and one of the six men convicted last year.Mr Sharp, representing the Crown, told Justices: "There is no possibility Mr Warren having been fitted up in respect of these matters."The rest of the gang, who are all appealing their convictions and sentences, are James O’Brien, 45, of Tunnel Street, St Helier , and local men Jason Woodward, 22, Paul Hunt, 27, and Oliver Lucas, 23.
Mr Sharp continued: There is no suggestion that any of the evidence was fabricated, that a police officer lied about when or where he saw Warren, that somehow conversations had been doctored....."The reality was here are facts plainly beyond dispute and for the jury it was why they happened and what interpretation should be put on various recorded conversations."With one exception the illegally-placed bugging device all the evidence was lawfully obtained. It is very difficult to see how allegations of a 'fit-up' were relevant to the issues in this case.
"The case was crying out for explanation as to Warren's behaviour and the things he did and said."The trial heard how Warren was watched by law enforcement agencies as soon as he left prison after finishing a 10-year stretch for his last large-scale drugs plot.The prosecution outlined to the jury how the Liverpool man had quickly travelled to Jersey after his release, and used his underworld contacts in Holland to set up a drugs deal for his friend Welsh who had lived for two decades on he island.


Marcia Robins, wife of former gang leader Darryl Harris

Posted On 10:13 0 comments

Marcia Robins, wife of former gang leader Darryl Harris, admitted dishonestly using three documents to rip off the taxpayer of more than $12,000, ONE News reported.
Court documents showed Robins received extra accommodation supplements and additional grants after claiming she was renting Christchurch homes for more than she was actually paying, or for homes she was not even living in.The Ministry of Social Development last year released data showing the couple were one of about 300 couples to draw $1000 a week in benefits.Robins will appear for sentencing on June 23.


Sunday, 21 March 2010

Joseph Ducarme is a 41-year-old "gangster-gangster- businessman

Posted On 09:45 0 comments

Joseph Ducarme is a 41-year-old "gangster-gangster- businessman owner of a clothing store on St. Jacques St. now riddled with bullet holes.The street gangs are growing up, says Montreal police Inspector Charles Mailloux."The phenomenon has been evolving since the 1980s. Young people of 14 and 15 years old are now 40. So they're more structured and associated with organized crime. They still hire people to sell drugs on the street, but they're evolving."Some fear the level of violence is evolving with them. Investigative journalist Julien Sher says when gangs like the Bloods in Montreal – also known as the Reds – take over from more established biker gangs and Mafia organizations, it can mean more unpredictable violence."We're looking at the next generation of gangsters," Sher said. "It's always dangerous to cry fire, but we have seen in Vancouver and Winnipeg that when less structured gangs get involved, there can be more violence because they can sometimes be more hot-headed and less disciplined. It may be harder for them to control their members."Maria Mourani, a Bloc MP who has written a book on Montreal's street gangs, says right now, all the groups are divided, including the Italian Mafia, and the street gangs that work with them."It's a very volatile environment," she said. But she believes someone will try to unite the "Italian clan" to take back control over territory, the street gangs and the "gangster-businessmen."


Saturday, 20 March 2010

Gangland - Bandito Army

Posted On 16:13 0 comments


electricians working on routine store renovations when suddenly they were caught in the middle of a gangland hit.

Posted On 15:59 0 comments

The men were on a job at the Old Montreal clothing boutique where four men were gunned down on Thursday. Two of the shooting victims died.A junior electrician working in a back office was shot in the face and is in serious condition in hospital. The 31-year-old man had the misfortune of standing in the open when the gunmen arrived. The more senior worker was on the sales floor, dived for cover behind furniture and escaped unhurt.“He was right there, but they didn't see me … he was where the action was, so they saw him and he got shot. I was scared shitless,” said the older man, a married father and grandfather.“I was trying not to be seen and I didn't want to see … I didn't want to get shot, you know. We were just electricians in the wrong place at the wrong time.”The senior man called 911 for his junior worker, whom he described as a serious young man who was always on time and didn't drink or do drugs. The junior employee has no wife or children, he said.
“I thought he could work for me forever,” the man said.
The brazen shooting at the i Flawnego boutique targeted a shop owned by a man identified as Ducarme Joseph, a 41-year-old with known gang ties and a long, violent criminal history. The electrician said Mr. Joseph escaped, apparently unhurt. One of the dead men, 27-year-old Peter Christopoulos, was reportedly Mr. Joseph's bodyguard. Mr. Joseph was arrested yesterday on a charge of violating bail conditions.The senior electrician, who asked that his identity be withheld to prevent reprisals, spent hours telling his story to police. He says he was unable to identify the two attackers. Other witnesses described them as black men who wore wigs and white bandanas during the attack and walked calmly away from the scene of the crime, peeling off their disguises.Police say the shootings were a professional hit. The case was quickly classified as organized crime infighting or retribution.Mr. Joseph's name is found in a series of search warrants and other court documents describing him as a drug dealer, loan enforcer with an entourage of bodyguards. Police say he feared retaliation from Arab and Italian mobsters, and motorcycle and street gangs.Gang experts theorize that the shootings were linked to the December murder of Nicolo (Nick) Rizzuto, the son of the reputed Montreal Mafia boss Vito Rizzuto.
Quebec's most famous crime chronicler, Claude Poirier, spoke yesterday of mob bounties exceeding $100,000 for Mr. Rizzuto's killers.


Gangland - Machete Slaughter Season 5 Episode 3 (2 of 5) Author: ganglandfull1

Posted On 15:56 0 comments


three major groups called Vozdovac, Surcin and Zemun which control the smaller groups. Presently there are about 30-40 groups working in Serbia

Posted On 14:36 0 comments


Serbian mafia operates in more than ten nations including Germany, United States, United Kingdom, France, etc. They are involved in diverse activities like drug trafficking, smuggling, contract killing, protection rackets, gambling and gen thefts. It has three major groups called Vozdovac, Surcin and Zemun which control the smaller groups. Presently there are about 30-40 groups working in Serbia.


In United States and United Kingdom, they run sex and drug trafficking rackets and are known for quick use of violence for vengeance.

Posted On 14:33 0 comments


Albanian Mafia consists of a large number of criminal organizations which are based in Albania. They are active in US and European countries as well. It is said that the Albanian mafia spread to international levels in the 1980s. Organized crime prevailed in Albania right from the 15th century. In United States and United Kingdom, they run sex and drug trafficking rackets and are known for quick use of violence for vengeance.


Jamaican-British Yardies

Posted On 14:31 0 comments


Jamaican-British Yardies were the Jamaicans who immigrated to Britain in 1950s. They were involved in gang violence and got to be known as Yardies. They conduct organized crimes like drug trade and other gun crimes. They haven’t tried infiltrating the law enforcement system so they aren’t considered to be as strong as other mafia groups. All the crimes involve the use of firearms the use of which is strictly controlled in Britain.


Tuesday, 16 March 2010

Jean Paul Beaumont was found not guilty of numerous charges including possession of a restricted firearm, possession of ammunition and careless storag

Posted On 08:41 0 comments

Jean Paul Beaumont was found not guilty of numerous charges including possession of a restricted firearm, possession of ammunition and careless storage. Police have previously identified Beaumont, 36, as a member of the Zig Zag Crew, the "puppet club" of the Hells Angels in Manitoba.Justice sources say the judge's decision, which will likely be appealed, illustrates how difficult it can be to prosecute organized-crime cases in Winnipeg.Provincial court Judge Catherine Carlson said there was plenty of "circumstantial evidence" against Beaumont, but not enough to convince her "beyond a reasonable doubt" that he was guilty.Police were conducting surveillance on a College Avenue home last June when they saw Beaumont get out of cab carrying a large bag they believed was concealing a firearm. Investigators got a magistrate to endorse a search warrant, which was executed later that night.
Police found the bag Beaumont was carrying in an upstairs bedroom, but it was empty. A search of the room revealed someone had recently accessed the attic, where a loaded rifle was found hidden. DNA tests on seven bullets revealed Beaumont had come in contact with at least some of them.Defence lawyer Chris McCoy took aim at the Crown's case, saying his client must be acquitted because police didn't actually see him physically handle the gun or stash the weapon in the attic. He called a witness, another known gang associate, who claimed he was the one who actually purchased the gun and hid it inside the home, which belonged to his mother.Carlson rejected the man's story Monday, calling it "incredible." She noted he initially told police he'd never seen the weapon before and was now trying to offer an alibi to protect Beaumont. The two men admitted to speaking to each other in recent months, but there was no evidence they had conspired together to evade justice.The judge said there were too many gaps in the evidence to link Beaumont to the rifle, even with his DNA on some of the bullets."It's not enough. He could have sneezed or coughed on them. We just don't know," Carlson said. "There is no evidence he actually held or touched them."Carlson noted there were several other people in the home at the time who never gave statements or testified about what they might have seen. There were no fingerprints found on the gun or the bullets, court was told.


Jimmy Siackasorn cop hater and disrespected member of the Tiny Rascals Gangsters

Posted On 08:29 0 comments

charged alleged street gang member Jimmy Siackasorn with murder. In his opening statement Monday, Deputy District Attorney Rod Norgaard portrayed Siackasorn, 19, as a cop hater and disrespected member of the Tiny Rascals Gangsters, whose criminal compatriots could barely stand him."He's the kind of guy when I would beat the crap out of him he'd still be talking (expletive) in the middle of the beating," Norgaard quoted one TRG member as characterizing Siackasorn.Assistant Public Defender Sue Karlton agreed that Siackasorn, who had been sleeping in cars, was largely despised in the tough neighborhood east of Franklin Boulevard across from the Campbell Soup plant they call "The Avenues.""No one really liked him," Karlton quoted one so-called friend as saying.Karlton did not contest that Siackasorn shot and killed Nguyen on Dec. 19, 2007. The issue, she said, is whether Siackasorn knew Nguyen was a cop."Jimmy Siackasorn didn't know Vu Nguyen was a police officer, and he shot in self- defense," Karlton said.If he didn't know Nguyen was a lawman, Siackasorn sure mouthed enough contempt in the years that preceded the shooting and the days that followed it to establish a mind-set for a cop killer, according to Norgaard's opening remarks to the jury.He was a "a very angry and hostile young man," Norgaard said, a kid who had been arrested 26 times from the age of 12 and who developed a hatred for police that carried all the way through the Nguyen killing.According to the DA, Siackasorn once told a probation officer at the Boys Ranch, "I'm going to come back here and kill somebody." He told a staffer at Juvenile Hall, "I will kill you," and another probation officer who contacted him, "You're lucky I didn't know you guys were coming, because we would have shot it out," Norgaard said.
After his arrest the night Nguyen died, Norgaard said, Siackasorn told a sheriff's photographer "that cop deserved it," and it was "lucky I didn't see you on the street. I would have shot your ass, too."Moments after Nguyen went down, Norgaard said, Siackasorn told at least three people he "shot a cop."Norgaard said the case is bolstered by clothing tinged with gunshot residue that witnesses said Siackasorn stashed in a chicken coop a few yards from where Nguyen died. The clothing contained DNA that matched Siackasorn's profile, according to Norgaard. Detectives also found two spent shell casings in the coop that matched the bullets recovered from Nguyen's body, the DA said.Norgaard said he intends to present evidence that Siackasorn knew Nguyen was a member of the sheriff's gang unit, and that he told a friend after the shooting that he had "just busted on task force."The prosecutor said that the gang unit's silver Nissan Maximas were well known in the neighborhood where Siackasorn hung out, and that the defendant – who had an arrest warrant pending after he ran away from a group home – knew exactly what was going on when Yee and Nguyen drove up on him.In his testimony, Yee said he and Nguyen were driving south on 37th Street coming up on 42nd Avenue about 2 p.m. when he saw somebody standing outside what the deputy described as a known Tiny Rascals Gangsters hangout. Detectives later said Siackasorn was waiting to buy some pot.Yee said "our interest was piqued when he looked at us and then turned around and walked away from us." Yee said he swerved the car toward the loiterer who then "breaks out in a full sprint."Nguyen "jumps out of the passenger side and gives chase," Yee testified. Yee said he whipped the car around the corner, looked up a driveway and saw Nguyen jump a fence and stand on what turned out to be a chicken coop.Thinking their suspect was heading south, Yee said he sped over to 43rd Avenue, to cut him off. He later remembered hearing some "faint noises" along the way.When he got to 43rd Avenue, Yee said the person they were after hopped fences back toward where he came from. Yee drove back to 42nd Avenue and realized he couldn't see Nguyen anymore. He called for backup and jumped the fence himself, where Nguyen was bleeding to death on top of the chicken coop.


Wednesday, 3 March 2010

Shay O'Byrne was shot dead in Tymon North Park

Posted On 13:25 0 comments

Shay O'Byrne was shot dead in Tymon North Park, Tallaght, south Dublin on March 13 last year.His girlfriend was also wounded in the attack.The arrested man was detained under section 30 of the Offences Against the State Act and was being questioned at Tallaght Garda Station.He can be held for up to 72 hours.The killing of O'Byrne, a leading figure in the south Dublin underworld, was linked to the Crumlin/Drimnagh feud which has claimed more than a dozen lives.


Phil Boudreault is behind bars once again, facing another allegation that he violated the long-term supervision order

Posted On 13:22 0 comments

Phil Boudreault is behind bars once again, facing another allegation that he violated the long-term supervision order he has been under since the summer of 2005.The allegation was made after Greater Sudbury Police stopped a vehicle on Notre Dame Avenue in Hanmer at about 3 p.m. on Friday.
Police said they clocked the vehicle on radar going 80 km/h in a 40-km/h zone.
The driver was identified as Boudreault, 35, of Hanmer.A 23-year-old male passenger in the vehicle was wanted on a warrant by North Bay OPP for drug possession. Officers found that he had brass knuckles, police said in a release.The passenger was arrested and held for bail for possessing a prohibited weapon and will be returned to North Bay on the warrant on his release in Sudbury.In late January, Boudreault pleaded guilty to violating the long-term offender supervision order by failing a urine test. He is to be sentenced for that April 27.The Sudbury Crown's office has said it will be arguing that Boudreault be sent back to prison for a lengthy period of time for that violation.Boudreault faces a maximum penalty of 10 years. There is no minimum penalty.If he is jailed, regardless of the length of the incarceration, he would serve it in a federal prison.Assistant Crown attorney Julie Lefebvre told Ontario Court Justice William Fitzgerald that Boudreault tested positive for THC, a component of marijuana, and for cocaine, during a urine test at his parole supervis o r's office May 21. He was arrested the next day.


murder rate of one body every 25 minutes, higher than in most civil wars

Posted On 13:19 0 comments


100,000 gang members in 137 gangs in the Cape Peninsula. In the deadly crossfire, in the city’s poorest township areas such as Mitchell’s Plain and Lavender Hill, there are families living behind the bars of their homes like prisoners. To make matters worse, schoolchildren - innocents taught to “duck and roll” in the earth of their playgrounds at the first sound of gunfire in their community - are the most vulnerable of all. For Cape Town’s most notorious street gangs, such as the 26s, 27s and 28s and their offshoots the Taliban, the Americans and the Hard Livings, the school gates are where their recruitment is done and where the next generation of gang members will be broken down and moulded into cold-blooded killers. Since the fall of apartheid, there has been an explosion of violent crime, mainly carried out by youngsters. It has produced a murder rate of one body every 25 minutes, higher than in most civil wars.


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